Featured Publishers
Architectural Association  
El Croquis  
Electa  
Global Architecture  
Gustavo Gili  
Japan Architect / A+U  
Quart Verlag  
William Stout  
Architecture
American Vernacular  
Building Types  
Drawing & Model Making  
Ecological  
History & Theory  
Materials  
Monographs  
Region  
Religious Architecture  
Residential  
Technical  
Ceramics
Decorative Arts
Art Deco & Art Nouveau  
Art Glass  
Decorative Arts  
Jewelry & Fashion  
Design
Color  
Furniture  
Graphic Design  
Identity & Information  
Industrial Design  
Packaging & Book Design  
Typography  
DVD
DVD  
Fashion
Fine Art
Art History & Theory  
Art Monographs  
European Avant-Garde  
Photography  
Gift Certificates
Gift Certificates  
Interiors
Arts & Crafts  
Commercial & Retail  
Interior Design  
Lighting  
Lofts  
Textiles & Surfaces  
Landscape
Landscape Architecture  
Other
Out of Print
G.E. Kidder Smith Library  
Ludwig Glaeser Library  
Michael Boyd Library  
OP Art  
OP European Avant-Garde  
OP Graphic Design  
OP History & Theory  
OP Landscape  
OP Monographs  
OP Photography  
OP Regional  
OP Urban Planning  
Rare Periodicals  
Urban Planning
Urban Planning  

Town House: Architecture and Material Life in the Early American City, 1780-1830.
Herman, Bernard L.
Town House: Architecture and Material Life in the Early American City, 1780-1830.
In this abundantly illustrated volume, Bernard Herman provides a history of urban dwellings and the people who built and lived in them in early America. In the eighteenth century, cities were constant objects of idealization, often viewed as the outward manifestations of an organized, civil society. As the physical objects that composed the largest portion of urban settings, town houses contained and signified different aspects of city life, argues Herman. Taking a material culture approach, Herman examines urban domestic buildings from Charleston, South Carolina, to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, as well as those in English cities and towns, to better understand why people built the houses they did and how their homes informed everyday city life. Working with buildings and documentary sources as diverse as court cases and recipes, Herman interprets town houses as lived experience. Chapters consider an array of domestic spaces, including the merchant family's house, the servant's quarter, and the widow's dower. Herman demonstrates that city houses served as sites of power as well as complex and often conflicted artifacts mapping the everyday negotiations of social identity and the display of sociability.

Category: Architecture, American Vernacular
Binding: Cl.
Pages: 320 pp
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press.
Year: 2005
Publication Place: Chapel Hill,
ISBN: 0807829919
Book Id: 93341

Price: $52.50

privacy policy | security | Site Map | Site by Bibliopolis | libraries